Always There

The third Rose single released on Fire records on 09/03/87 on vinyl 7″ and 12″ format, including for the first time, a limited edition 12″ with a ‘Mainline’ remix of the title track, an extra track (“Mainline Man”) and special rose embossed sleeve. Read the press release here

This record represents the first total break from material written by the original Rose of Avalanche lineup (Morris / Berry / Davis) with all the recordings being new tracks written during 1986 / 87. This record also represents the first complete recording with the Rose Mark 2 line up of Morris / Berry / Schultz / McKay / Thompson.

The band must have completed the recording sessions during The Mission World Crusade support slots of late 1986 / early 1987, which although must have been exhausting, really helped to develop their live performance capability, which is evident in the Always There sessions.

All the songs have that classic rock 5 piece line up feel.

The title track “Always There” did always feel like it was playing up to the Goth genre, as the lyrical theme is pretty depressing being based around suicide, and the opening drum pattern reminds the listener of The Sisters of Mercy’s “Alice”. However, that aside, “Always There” continues the growing body of sophisticated, complex dual guitar work, now benefiting from the warmer, less mechanical, rhythm section of McKay and Thompson.

The Rock ‘n’ Roll roots resurface on “Mainline Man”, which is similar in style to some of the earlier tracks featuring on the “LA Rain” and “Goddess” singles, and the track quickly became established in the Rose’s live repertoire.

Homage is again paid to the Rose’s influences, with a cover of The Doors “Waiting For The Sun”. Despite being a huge fan of The Doors myself, I really think the Rose managed to make this song their own with a great version of the track.

Finally, we behold the might that is “Majesty”. I described this as a “fantastic, orgasm of wonder!”. I defy anyone that loves guitar music not to give in to their heart strings being plucked and tickled by the closing 1:30 in particular. Every time I hear that track it still gives me that warm fuzzy feeling where my brain must be releasing some unpronounceable chemical, telling me this is rather good, give me more…

I truly believe no other band was writing music like this in 1987, and I think the band felt the same. You could feel the growing resentment of being overlooked by the mainstream press who at the time were under the spell of Mr Hussey and The Mission. Of course that is not to say the Rose were not blameless in all this. They never were “media” friendly in the same way as The Mission were, and maybe naively, felt the music should do the talking.

Always There 7" A Side
Always There (The Rose of Avalanche) (3:23)
B Side
Waiting For The Sun (Jim Morrison) (3:48)
Catalogue Number: Blaze 18
Notes: Note red lettering – different to 12″

 

Always There 12"

 

 

A Side
Always There (The Rose of Avalanche) (3:23)
B Side
Waiting For The Sun (Jim Morrison) (3:48)
Majesty (The Rose of Avalanche) (5:56)
Catalogue Number: Blaze 14T
Notes: Note white lettering – different to 7″

 

Always There Limited Edition 12"
A Side
Always There (The Mainline Mix) (The Rose of Avalanche) (3:23)
The Mainline Man (The Rose of Avalanche) (3:12)
B Side
Waiting For The Sun (Jim Morrison) (3:48)
Majesty (The Rose of Avalanche) (5:56)
Catalogue Number: Blaze 14TR
Notes: Rose embossed sleeve